Book review: Cold Comfort Farm

‘Cold Comfort Farm’

“… on the whole I thought I liked having everything very tidy and calm all around me, and not being bothered to do things, and laughing at the kind of joke other people didn’t think at all funny, and going for country walks, and not being asked to express opinions about things (like love, and isn’t so-and-so peculiar?”

― Stella Gibbons, Cold Comfort Farm

Author Stella Gibbons

Country United Kingdom

Language English

Publication date 1932

ISBN 0-14-144159-3 (current Penguin Classics edition)

Stella Gibbons wrote ‘Cold Comfort Farm’ as a parody on the dramatic novels placed rural settings, ever so popular at that time.

At the age of nineteen, Flora Poste becomes a poor orphan and she decides to live with relatives in the countryside of Sussex and as she calls it, to collect material for a book she is going to publish when she is fifty three.

Cold Comfort Farm turns out to be a drab and somber place in an appalling state with an incredible number of odd characters all belonging to the Starkadder family and ruled by Great Aunt Ada Doom.

Well, leave it to Flora Poste, who can not endure a mess, to sort her family out,drag them into to the twentieth century and bring them to the higher common sense often with the help of one of her unexpected connections and unorthodox methods.

Despite its age,I find the book refreshing and incredibly witty. I love Flora’s down to earth character and the unexpected twists and turns it brings to the story.Not always easy to read because of the use of the Sussex dialect and invented words but this gives the book an extra charm.

In 1995, an excellent movie was made based on the book.

Stella Gibbons schreef ‘Cold Comfort Farm’ als een parodie op de populaire dramatische romans die zich bij voorkeur afspeelden op t platteland.

Op negentien jarige leeftijd, blijft Flora Poste na de dood van haar ouders achter als arme wees. Ze besluit te verhuizen naar familie op t platteland van Sussex en daar zoals zij t noemt, materiaal te verzamelen voor haar boek dat ze gaan uitgeven op drieënvijftig jarige leeftijd.

Cold Comfort Farm blijkt een grauw en somber gebeuren, in zwaar vervallen staat en waar een onwaarschijnlijk aantal merkwaardige leden van de Starkadder familie leven, geregeerd door oudtante Ada Doom.

Nou, laat t maar over aan Flora Poste, die rommel niet uit kan staan, om haar familie tot de orde te roepen, in de twintigste eeuw te slepen en ze een stuk gezond verstand bij te brengen. Vaak met de hulp van een van haar onverwachte connecties en onorthodoxe methoden.

Ondanks dat het boek in 1932 al is gepubliceerd, vind ik het fris en ongelooflijk geestig en gevat. Ik vind Flora’s nuchtere karakter en de onverwachte wendingen die dat teweegbrengt in t verhaal verrukkelijk.

Door t gebruik van t dialect van Sussex en eigen verzonnen woorden is t boek niet altijd gemakkelijk te lezen maar t geeft wel extra charme aan t verhaal.

Ik heb t boek nooit in t Nederlands gelezen.

Love and Liefs, Johanna.


2 thoughts on “Book review: Cold Comfort Farm

  1. Hi Ann, the movie is fabulous and so funny! The book will not disappoint you, there just more;0) I think they did made good choices when making a film script from the book. Please, let me know what you think?
    Alas, I am not a computer wizard. My sons set up this blog for me when they moved out so they could keep track of my ‘important nothings’ (they live in Toronto). I think the fond comes with the lay out of the blog (= a standard choice from wordpress) and maybe if you browse through the wizards you will find some more options??? I will ask about it when I meet my ‘IT managers’ again;0)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s